Oliver Thewalt

    Oliver Thewalt

    Theoretical Physics | Quantum Biology | Dark Matter Research | Energy Consulting | Creation of Hydrogen ATOM in the Higgs Field >> Vote for Nobel Prize

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    CANTOR Under Pressure

    Guest Post by Jonathan Vos Post …......................Approx. 1,000 words

    3225 N. Marengo Ave
    Altadena, CA 91001
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    “CANTOR Under Pressure” INCOMPLETE typing
    by Jonathan Vos Post...

    {{new fiction #__ of 2017}}

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    [Paragraph 1 of 33] [17 handwritten pp.]

    .St.Petersburg, 1845

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    Georg Cantor was born on the third day of March 1845. His father was a Danish merchant, Georg Woldeman Cantor, born Jewish, converted to Protestant, settled in Russia, and married the Catholic Maria Bohm. How do you solve a problem like Maria?

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    Georg and the other Cantor kids, Constantin and Sophie, had all the math magic madness which Georg felt in his bones as Mathematics, Constantin in Music, and Sophie in painting.

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    The lunatic, the lover, and the poet

    Are of imagination all compact,” as Shakespear paralelled.

    “One sees more devils than vast hell can hold—

    That is the madman. The lover, all as frantic,

    Sees Helen’s beauty in a brow of Egypt.

    The poet’s eye, in fine frenzy rolling,

    Doth glance from heaven to Earth, from Earth to heaven.

    And as imagination bodies forth

    The forms of things unknown, the poet’s pen

    Turns them to shapes and gives to airy nothing

    A local habitation and a name.”

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    But, for a successful man, the thing to do is hire the best tutors.


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    Georg the father said: “Boy, you will be the greatest engineer in the world.”

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    Georg the son thought silently:

    “As if Archimedes drew nothing but circles in the sand.”


    [end typing of handwritten p.1 of 17]

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    .St. Petersburg, 1856

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    Georg the son, at the prime age of 11, had his world turn upside-down. The harsh Russian climate had worn down his father, so, for health, they moved to Frankfurt, Germany.

    Private tutors four more years. At semiprime age 15 = 3 x 5, Georg started at Grand-Ducal Higher Polytechnic, Darmstadt, to study what his father paid for – Engineering.


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    His father wrote him a letter:
    “Your father, or rather your parents and all the rest of the family in Germany and Russia and Denmark have eyes on you, expecting nothing less than that you become a shining star on the horizon of engineers”
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    Horizon, star, circle, Point At Infinity.


    [end typing {10 May 2017} of handwritten p.2 of 17]
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    [Paragraph 8 of 33]

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    In Geometry, a 'point at infinity' or 'ideal point' is an idealized limiting point at the 'end' of each line. In the case of an affine plane (including the Euclidean plane), there is one ideal point for each pencil of parallel lines of the plane.

    Constantin played an achingly sweet 1828 Franz Schubert melody, like leaves blowing across snow.

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    Sophie painted the people walking along the Neva river as she recalled St. Petersburg, but with something disturbing about perspective. Vast luxuriant tracts of animated snow.

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    After two years of Applied Math of Engineering, Georg the son begged to change his research subject, and do Math for the sake of Math, not stress and strains in Doric columns.

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    Georg the father relented, agreeing by letter. The son wrote back: “Your letter pleased me. It settles my future. My last days here have been filled with doubt and indecision. I was torn between duty and desire. How happy I am now that I see it will not displease you if I follow my feeling in my choice. I hope you will live to find pleasure in me, dear father, for my soul can succeed in what he wants me to do and toward what is driven by a secret, unknown voice.”


    [end typing {10 May 2017} of handwritten p.3 of 17]

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    [Paragraph 11 of 33] [typed Thursday 11 May 2017]

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    Young Georg continued his education in Zurich, but his father died in 1863. So onto Berlin. To solve the mysteries of Mathematics, Physics, Philosophy. Passed oral exams Magnum Cum Laude in 1867. Doctorate!

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    [Paragraph 12 of 33] [typed Thursday 11 May 2017]

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    Then on, delving into first rate ideas, while teachng at a small seco9nd rate school – Halle University.

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    [Paragraph 13 of 33] [typed Thursday 11 May 2017]

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    Which is when his genius plumbed the implications of Noneuclidean Geometry. DIFFERENT KINDS OF SPACE. As different from Euclid as Painting is to Music.

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    [Paragraph 14 of 33] [typed Thursday 11 May 2017]

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    If you think you are a character in a story, you need to know the genre of the story. If you are in an unfamiliar space --- YOU NEED TO KNOW THE TOPOLOGY OF THAT SPACE.


    [end typing {11 May 2017} of handwritten p.4 of 17]

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    [Paragraph 15 of 33] [typed Thursday 11 May 2017]

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    “Oiler?” said Sophie, wiping paint from her right thumb with turpentine on a rag. “Oiler? Like someone who puts oil on machinery?”

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    [Paragraph 16 of 33] [typed Thursday 11 May 2017]

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    “Spelled EULER,” said Georg, her brother. Leonhard Euler, you heard of him in Zurich. He'd been born in Basel 15 April 1707, son of a Calvinist minister. Greatest mathematician in Europe, celebrated in the Courts of Louis XIV, Catherine the Great, Frederick the Great of Prussia, and Peter the Great of our long lost winter eden Russia.”

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    [Paragraph 17 of 33] [typed Thursday 11 May 2017]

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    “I had to convince Dad to let me drop Engineering to do pure Math. Euler had to learn Oriental Languages and Theology as his father intended. He got Bernoulli on his side.”

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    “Peter the Great, our amazing six foot, seven inches swashbuckling Tsar who dragged Russia into the modern Europe of shipyards and universities.”

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    [end typing {11 May 2017} of handwritten p.5 of 17]